Nintendo Wii Mini: Ready to Launch December 7th for $99.99!

by Blogger on ‎11-27-2012 05:00 AM - last edited on ‎03-22-2013 10:06 AM by Best Buy Best Buy

Wii Mini RVO boxThe Nintendo Wii is one of the most influential and best-selling gaming consoles of all time.  Featuring one of the largest gaming libraries, the Wii was the first system to bring home affordable motion sensor gaming, and set a standard for gaming consoles and peripherals going forward.  On December 7th, Nintendo is ready to re-introduce the Wii, with a twist.

Touted as “Big Fun, for a Mini Price,” The Nintendo Wii Mini brings home all the excitement and motion gaming of the original, at a fraction of the size, and price tag.  The Wii Mini has been completely re-designed from the base-up, resulting in a smaller console.  The flat resting system features a manual release top-loading system, which will look to provide owners with a longer lifespan, since it relies on less electronics to power the loading and ejecting of discs.  Similar problems led Panasonic and Sega to have to redesign some of their early systems.  While Nintendo has never had similar problems with the Wii’s original disc drive, this is a good safety measure in place to ensure you’ll never have to experience that issue.  At an introductory price of $99.99, the red and black Wii Mini system comes with the console, sensor bar and a Red MotionPlus controller with Nunchuk.


The Wii Mini aims to introduce (or reintroduce) a new generation to its original gaming options.  For the last six years, the Wii has pushed the limits of what we had originally thought were possible to get out of our console games, and spawned a new generation of interactive gaming in general.  From the first time a Wiimote was waved as a magic wand in the Harry Potter games, used as an eraser in Warioware, or the Wiimote and Nunchuk had to act the part of a runner’s legs in Madden Football, the Wii has been everything from a good system for party games, to a good source of exercise.  Now, with this miniature version of the Wii, more gamers than ever can share in everything it has to offer. 

Wii Mini RVO bundle

 

While the system has no Internet connectivity options or Gamecube support, it features full functionality and compatibility with the Wii’s expansive library of over 1,300 games and its associated peripherals, totaling nearly 1 billion games sold.  From the massively popular Mario Kart Wii, to the Legend of Zelda series, the simplified nature of the Wii Mini allows for an easier out-of-the-box gaming experience, and is perfect for those who want to check out the Wii and could not pick up the console before, or a quick addition to a rec or gaming room.  If you have a Wii already, a Mini would make a great backup, or travel size companion.

 

You can also register your Wii Mini with Club Nintendo (club.nintendo.com) and get 100 coins, which are redeemable for everything from exclusive posters and notebooks to games.

  

Best Buy will be carrying the Nintendo Wii Mini starting on December 7th and you can now pre-order one today (November 27th.)  The Nintendo Wii Mini, and its introductory price of $99.99 are only available in Canada this Holiday Season.

Wii Mini

Comments
by PARANOID365 on ‎11-29-2012 12:21 PM - last edited on ‎11-29-2012 02:03 PM by Moderator

Wow, Wow, Wow, this is exactly why I think Nintendo, is such a bad company.

 

1) It wasn't bad enough that they took all the nintendo users for a ride when the released the Wii, which was inferior. Underpowered, no 3rd party support, nothing but party games, and the semi real games they had were **bleep**, looked like **bleep**, or played like **bleep**. I highly respect Shigeru Miyamoto as one of the best game designers in the ever, period, but just because he, (and the other talking heads of Nintendo), were feeling young, and playful one day, doesn't mean they should have released this kiddie, "wannabe console", that should have been $99, or less, to begin with!! :smileyembarrassed:

 

2) Then after Nintendo drained every single cent from their customers, (who actually tried to defend it), they turn around and release the Wii U console, which they should have released 5+ years ago instead of the childrens toy, "wannabe console",  Wii. The worst part is that they finally made a serious gaming machine, but they just couldn't help themselves, and had to add some more kiddie parts. You know why this is absolutely true, because if they truly felt that their stupid Wii U controller, (which is upwards of $150 to replace, or purchase a 2nd one), was the best, they would not be offering the pro controller. I know the argument will be, "well different strokes for diffrent folks", but that doesn't hold water, because if the Wii U controller is the best option, then stick with it, (perfect example, their herendous N64 controller, it design flaw, but Nintendo felt it was the best for the system, so they basically said, "shut up, and play with what you are given")!!

 

3) Now, after ripping off their customers with the Wii, expecting them 2 buy the Wii U, they bring out the mini Wii !! Are you kidding me, now they are going to try and sell this waste of space, again, taking all their nintendo fan on another ride on the money coaster we refer to as the Wii, (and don't bother with the, "new adopters", excuse, because they shouldn't be selling this toy to anyone ever again) !! :smileymad:

 

Come-on Nintendo, I think one system is good enough, admit the Wii sucked,

by Blogger on ‎12-02-2012 10:07 PM

Interesting argument. 

 

Re-designing a console and releasing it back out on the market in a slimmer package (or one with less moving parts) is nothing new.  If you're going to take issue with Nintendo doing it, maybe you should call Sega, Sony, Microsoft, Panasonic, Phillips, SNK and Atari out on it too.  They're some of the manufacturers who did the same thing to bring new life to an old system, and all of them (with the exception of the 3DO and Phillips CDi) worked. The Master System getting re-introduced in South America was so popular that it still thrived until a few years ago, nearly 20 years after it was phased out in North America and Japan.

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